Skip to main content

About your Search

20120930
20121008
Search Results 0 to 2 of about 3
to apply the law. and if you do that in this case, there is no reasonable justification for a continuation of the exclusivity ban. so i think, i think the chairman's order as you describe it, um, is the appropriate course of action to take. um, you know, are -- and that's been comcast's position in the proceeding. um, life is long. as you note, our order lasts until 2018. and so for whatever it applies to over that period of time, it applies to. but after that period of time, we should be treated like everybody else, um, and, again, if people believe that it is appropriate for the exclusivity ban to continue, they need to go back to congress and to get different legislation than the legislation that exists now. because the current legislation simply does not support the exclusivity ban and the current competitive posture of the marketplace. >> so what happens when october 5th rolls around and it expires presumably? do we suddenly see several exclusive contracts out there? >> guest: i don't think so. i think the fears there have been overstated, but i obviously don't know for sure. i think
journal" tomorrow morning, we'll examine the health care law that presidential candidate mitt romney signed into law when he was governor of massachusetts. our guest is boston herald reporter christine mcconnell. we'll be joined by howard kertz and lauren ashburn of the daily download to look at the use of social media in the presidential campaign. and we'll discuss the college board's recent report on how high school students are doing on the s.a.t.s. our guest is college board vice president james montoya. washington journal journal is live on c-span every day at 7 a.m. eastern. >>> tuesday the new america foundation looks at the role of money in the 2012 elections. panelists include former sec chairman trevor potter. live coverage starting at 12:15 p.m. eastern on c-span. >> every generation through our history has worked and sacrificed to leave a better country to their children, their grandchildren and future generations. we're spending their money, we are now even more, much more spending their money, and we are leaving them a mess that will be a very difficult to deal with, a
served as deputy counsel that -- he has a law degree from the university of chicago. >> an impressive background. have you been lobbied by anyone who you have -- used to work with? >> no i have not. >> most of the people who comment on the public record spend a lot of time -- what are you going to do personally that your opinion is informed with what is happening with the average consumer? >> every confirmation hearing, i stated that i would hold no favor our prejudice with any particular company or segment of the industry. i would like to think that i have had privileged serving at the fcc and has stayed true to it -- true to that. a number have been with public interest groups, even individuals. when i go outside of washington to visit various places, and make a point of visiting citizens who have not been involved in the communications industry, but by decisions that we have had to make. i heard from citizens in kansas about different communications issues that affected them. it is a good way to stay grounded, as it were. it is too easy to think about these things as abstractions o
Search Results 0 to 2 of about 3